Chocolate Dipped Fruit

As Easter approaches, we’ll be faced with a vast array of colorful sweets, chocolate bunnies, and entirely too much candy. But you don’t need to box yourself off entirely from the indulgence of the season! I wanted to show you a simple Easter treat that will satisfy your desire for dessert as well as impress your friends.

In stores, expensive chocolate covered fruit often looks way too time consuming to make yourself, but it’s actually incredibly simple!

Chocolate Dipped Strawberries

Dipped Strawberries

1 pound Strawberries
3 ounce dark chocolate bar (at least 70%)

Wash strawberries, leaving the stems on, and pat dry or set on a towel to dry. Make sure the berries are completely dry before dipping. If small amounts of water are added to the chocolate while dipping the berries, it will cause the chocolate to become grainy and ruined for further dipping. (If you do accidentally get water in your chocolate, you can revive it by vigorously stirring in a bit of hot milk. This will get rid of the grainy texture, but will prevent the chocolate from completely hardening on your fruit. In this case, you’ve now made a creamy chocolate sauce! Add some hot cream and you have truffles that can be rolled out and covered in cocoa powder once the chocolate cools.)

Place a large piece of parchment paper on a baking tray or cutting board to hold the strawberries in a single layer after dipping.

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Melting Chocolate

Break the chocolate bar into pieces and place in the top pot of a double boiler. Bring water in the bottom pot to a boil in order to steam heat the top pot and melt the chocolate without burning it.

If you don’t have a double boiler, you can use a flame deflector over one of your stove burners set to low heat. With a stainless steal pan, the deflector will lower and evenly distribute the heat to uniformly melt chocolate.

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Once chocolate is melted, make sure strawberries are dry and then dip them in one at a time, holding by the green leafy parts. Cover the berry in chocolate, leaving a small space around the leaves and stem. Let any excess chocolate drip back into the bowl. Then place the berry on the parchment paper to cool.

Note: Although I don’t typically recommend using microwaves, chocolate is easily melted in the microwave without having to use a double boiler. Follow manufacturer instructions for melting chocolate.

Dipping

Leave berries on the counter to cool for a few hours. You can also place them in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or until chocolate is hardened. Remove and serve at room temperature.

Drizzle any remaining chocolate onto the berries in a zigzag pattern.

Coconut Clusters

Cluster

Alternately, you can use leftover chocolate to make a few Coconut Clusters. Add shredded coconut and nuts to the remaining melted chocolate, stirring well to completely cover. Scoop the mixture into small clusters on parchment paper and set aside to cool

Chocolate Dipped Bananas, Tangerines, Pear, Apricots

Chocolate Dipped Fruit

Peel and thickly slice bananas, separate wedges of tangerine, or cut other fruits, like pears or apples, into slices, then dip them into melted chocolate. Use a toothpick to hold the fruit if you want it completely covered in chocolate. You can also halfway cover, allowing a small portion of the fruit to show. Place on parchment paper to cool.

Bananas are also nice frozen into thick slices and chocolate dipped. Or, place a wooden chopstick in the end of a whole banana, then freeze and dip into chocolate.

Substitute dried fruit like apricots or other fruit in place of the strawberries. Dip halfway or more into the chocolate to allow a small portion of the fruit to show. Set aside to cool on parchment paper.

Sprinkle the chocolate dipped fruit with shredded coconut or finely chopped nuts before it dries. This adds a fun texture and interesting additional flavors!

Enjoy this Easter or just the Spring without deprivation!!

  • Mary Sussman

    I have heard that cooking potatoes then refrigerating them greatly reduces their carb content. Further, using vinegar on them, as in potato salad, further reduces their carb content. Do you have any info on this? Is this reduction significant enough to allow for an occasional serving of potato salad in Phase 2?

    Also, there are some nice vegetable blends called Protein Blends in the frozen food section. They are high protein and use legumes and quinoa and bulgar. I like the Tuscan Blend and the California Blend. What do you think of these products?