Hatch Green Chiles: Late summer is the perfect time for one of our favorite seasonal ingredients!

The Hatch Green Chile is only grown in the Hatch Valley of New Mexico, where unique growing conditions contribute to the Chiles’ distinct flavor. New Mexico State University, where Fabian Garcia developed the first long green New Mexican Chile pepper in the early twentieth century, has been cultivating these Chiles for over 100 years.

The New Mexico Green Chili has a delicious, smokey flavor that is unmatched in the world of chilis. The flavor ranges from mild to spicy, and the grocer will usually label the mild, medium and hot ones. If your grocer doesn’t have them, you can order them online.

For seven years, I lived in New Mexico where Hatch Green Chilis are everywhere! As a state staple, they were served with every kind of meal. I loved it! Luckily for us, these crisp peppers are distributed nationwide, and we found some at our local grocery store. You can find them fresh or sometimes pre-roasted.

If you buy fresh chilis, roast them on the grill or in the oven until the skin is blackened, then peel them. Be careful! The capsaicin in these peppers makes them extremely hot and can aggravate your skin and eyes. Be sure to use gloves, protective eyewear, or other methods while peeling the roasted peppers.

peeling-peppers

After roasting, the blackened skin should peel off easily. I hold one end of the pepper down with a fork, and then peel with a spatula, thus avoiding touching these little beauties. The vein is the hottest part of the chili, so leave a portion of it in if you want some extra heat. Here’s a useful site for peeling and roasting instructions if you need more guidance. 

I bought several pounds of roasted chilis this year. With this particular batch, I made Green Chili Mayonnaise. Stay tuned for more green chili recipes as I work my way through the bounty. The Green Chili Mayo goes well on anything. Spice up vegetables, beans, soups, whole grains or anything else you can imagine.

You can even spread the mayo on top of fish and bake it  like we did in the ALWAYS HUNGRY? Book with the Chipotle Mayo Baked Fish (p. 250)

Green Chile Mayo

½ cup unsweetened soymilk or whole milk

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice

½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar

1 clove garlic

1 medium green Chile, roasted, peeled, and seeded (see above)

¼ – ½ teaspoon salt

1 ¼ cup neutral tasting oil (such as avocado oil)

Preparationroasted-chiles

Place all ingredients, except the oil, in a wide-mouthed glass mason jar or a cup that will fit an immersion blender without splashing.

Blend with the immersion blender until creamy.

Add oil and blend again until thick and creamy.

Adjust seasoning to taste, and remember that flavors will develop over the next hours and days . Place lid on the jar. Allow the flavors to develop for 1 hour or more in the refrigerator. The mayonnaise will keep for 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

Versatility!

Creamy Lime Cilantro Dressing

Creamy Lime Cilantro Dressing

You can add a seasonal kick to any number of your favorite AH recipes!

You might try adding a green Chile to the Creamy Lime Cilantro Dressing (ALWAYS HUNGRY Book p. 271)! Or use a green Chile instead of dill for the Creamy Dill Sauce (ALWAYS HUNGRY Book p. 270. Substitute lime in place of lemon). In the Ranchero Sauce, you could use green Chiles in place of Jalapeños! The possibilities are endless!

What’s your favorite way to use these peppers? Let us know in the comments!

Click here for a printable version of this recipe!

  • Preston Mitchell

    Thanks for sharing our roasting and peeling instructions, Dr. Ludwig! We’d love to ship you a box of fresh or roasted chile as a thank you. If you’d like one, shoot us an email! [email protected]

    • Preston Mitchell

      Also, there actually isn’t any heat in the seeds at all. All of the heat in the vast majority of capsicum annum varieties will be in the vein that runs up the side of the pod. Any capsaicin that is on the seeds is from them coming in contact with the placenta (the fleshy structure which the seeds grow on).

      • drdavidludwig

        Thank you Preston! Always learning something new. Is that why the top part of the chilis always seem hotter than the bottom? The veins converge at the top?
        — Chef Dawn

        • Preston Mitchell

          It is! In fact, as the chile matures, it sets more and more capsaicin in the vein starting at the top and working its way down towards the bottom.

  • Betsy Kocsis

    Looking forward to trying this recipe with Anaheim peppers, maybe the closest we can get to a Hatch chile here in WV. Thanks, Dawn!

  • John Fitrakis

    Just got this year’s peppers and can’t wait to make Hatch chili stew with pork.